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♂rafar ()
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Prochy Angeli


Tytuł oryginalny Angela's Ashes

Autor Frank McCourt
Dodane przez ♂bart ()
Forma opowiadanie
Gatunek na faktach
Tagi irlandzkie dzieciństwo, dzieci, Irlandia, bieda, New york, Pulizer Prize
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Od wydawcy

"When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood."

So begins the luminous memoir of Frank McCourt, born in Depression-era Brooklyn to recent Irish immigrants and raised in the slums of Limerick, Ireland. Frank's mother, Angela, has no money to feed the children since Frank's father, Malachy, rarely works, and when he does he drinks his wages. Yet Malachy - exasperating, irresponsible and beguiling - does nurture in Frank an appetite for the one thing he can provide: a story. Frank lives for his father's tales of Cuchulain, who saved Ireland, and of the Angel on the Seventh Step, who brings his mother babies.

Perhaps it is story that accounts for Frank's survival. Wearing rags for diapers, begging a pig's head for Christmas dinner and gathering coal from the roadside to light a fire, Frank endures poverty, near-starvation and the casual cruelty of relatives and neighbors - yet lives to tell his tale with eloquence, exuberance and remarkable forgiveness.

Angela's Ashes, imbued on every page with Frank McCourt's astounding humor and compassion, is a glorious book that bears all the marks of a classic.
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Opinie i recenzje

♂bart (), dodano 2007-10-20
"For the most part, his style is that of an Irish-American raconteur, honorably voluble and engaging. He is aware of his charm but doesn't disgracefully linger upon it. Induced by potent circumstances, he has told his story, and memorable it is."
New York Times Book Review - Denis Donoghue (09/15/1996)

"Frank McCourt...waited more than four decades to tell the story of his childhood, and it's been well worth the wait. With 'Angela's Ashes' he has used the storytelling gifts he inherited from his father to write a book that redeems the pain of his early years with wit and compassion and grace. He has written a book that stands...as a classic modern memoir."
New York Times - Michiko Kakutani (09/17/1996)

"...[W]hat is most remarkable is that he has managed to reenter his boyhood self so completely, while maintaining a quiet, sardonic, authorial distance from his early life, which gives 'Angela's Ashes' its rigor and power. Whatever scars McCourt bears from his childhood, they are not exorcised here. Only someone who has successfully battled with his demons could have crafted such a compelling work of art out of his own pain."
Los Angeles Times Book Review - Mary M. Morrissey (09/29/1996)

"An extraordinary work in every way. McCourt magically retrieves love, dignity, and humor from a childhood of hunger, loss, and pain."
Kirkus Reviews (07/01/1996)

"Unguarded and stunningly unpretentious, ANGELA'S ASHES creeps up on you with all the ghostlike force of a winter afternoon in Ireland....A story so immediate--so gripping in its daily despairs, stolen smokes, and blessed humor--that you want to thank God young Frankie McCourt survived it in part so he could write the book."
Boston Globe - Gail Caldwell

"The most gloriously unwholesome memoir of the year has to be ANGELA'S ASHES. The tale of an Irish childhood blighted by poverty, drink, violence, panic and despair and blessed by an author with a huge sense of the ridiculous plus the ability to forgive everyone, even himself. Give 'Angela' to anyone who loves a roaring story in language so fresh it sometimes comes as a shock to the system."
Washington Post Book World - Rebecca Pepper Sinkler (11/24/1996)

"ANGELA'S ASHES is not and will never be...'a classic memoir,' because its author lacks an internal editor, a sense of developing structure. The language is monotonous and the incidents are repetitive. The characterizations are perfunctory.... ANGELA'S ASHES goes on at relentless length, and is actually quite a job to finish. Laboring through it, the reader also begins to feel certain nagging irritations and doubts. One concerns the relation of text to fact."
New Republic - R. F. Foster (11/01/1999)
♂bart (), dodano 2007-10-20

"Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood," writes Frank McCourt in Angela's Ashes. "Worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood." Welcome, then, to the pinnacle of the miserable Irish Catholic childhood. Born in Brooklyn in 1930 to recent Irish immigrants Malachy and Angela McCourt, Frank grew up in Limerick after his parents returned to Ireland because of poor prospects in America. It turns out that prospects weren't so great back in the old country either--not with Malachy for a father. A chronically unemployed and nearly unemployable alcoholic, he appears to be the model on which many of our more insulting cliches about drunken Irish manhood are based. Mix in abject poverty and frequent death and illness and you have all the makings of a truly difficult early life. Fortunately, in McCourt's able hands it also has all the makings for a compelling memoir.
amazon.com
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Cytaty

♂bart (), dodano 2007-10-20
"When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood."
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